What You Need to Know: Meeting Specialty Fire Hydrant Flow Requirements

Every jurisdiction has fire protection codes and requirements for new construction and remodels.  Many require only that you follow the International Fire Code and have signed sealed hydraulic calculations, but others have their own requirements. 

Alternatives in Engineering can help you with signed sealed hydraulic calculations and any unique requirements a jurisdiction can throw at us.

Here are some examples of unique requirements around the country:

City of Austin Fire Protection Rule requires the following:

For hydrant flow calculations, follow Appendix B of 2012 IFC but limit reduction of fire flow to 50% for certain building types

Accepted “C” values for calculations are 110 for PVC & Copper 80 otherwise

Austin Water also requires General Construction Notes and project information on drawings.

Port St. Lucie, FL requires the following in stamped sealed calculations: Continue reading “What You Need to Know: Meeting Specialty Fire Hydrant Flow Requirements” »

On this Date in History: March 9, 1914

MAC building 2
101 Years Ago Today
Today marks 101 years since the deadliest fire in our hometown city, St. Louis.  The quick-spreading fire killed 30 men and destroyed the seven-story Boatmen’s Bank building at Washington Avenue and Fourth Street.  Boatmen’s Bank built the building in 1890 and had offices on the first floor.   The rest of the building was occupied by the Missouri Athletic Club (MAC), founded in 1903. The men’s club remodeled to house dining and meeting spaces, a gym and swimming pool, a Turkish bath, barber shop, bar, and an area of small sleeping rooms, all made of wood, for 97 members and guests on the fifth and sixth floors.  Most of the victims of the fire were trapped there or died trying to escape.  About 90 members, guests, and employees were in the building at the time of the fire, though the desk registry was destroyed so no one can be sure.

Continue reading “On this Date in History: March 9, 1914” »

On this Date in History: February 23, 1991

Contributed by Stephanie Lange

One Meridian Plaza Fire
Three Philadelphia firefighters lost their lives fighting the largest high-rise office building fire in modern American history at the Meridian Bank Building, also known as One Meridian Plaza. Twenty-four additional firefighters were injured. The fire extended from the 22nd up to the 30th floor, with an estimated $100 million in direct property damage. Twelve-alarms brought 51 engine companies and over 300 firefighters to the scene.

Construction on the 38-story Meridian Bank Building began in 1968 and was completed for occupancy in 1973. The building’s fire protection systems was upgraded around 1988. Manual pull fire alarms were replaced by automatic central station monitored alarms. The originally installed dry standpipe system was replaced with a wet system that was fed by Continue reading “On this Date in History: February 23, 1991” »

Fire Protection Engineering Services

Fire protection engineering is the combination of principals and practices that aim to predict fire hazards and protect property against the possible damages caused by fire. Fire engineering can be provided through many different services.

 

  • Design Services- In the preliminary stages, fire protection engineering would include design services for fire protection solutions based on a risk and hazard analysis, code consultation, and hydraulic analysis.

 

  • Fire Hazard Assessments- Fire protection engineering involves evaluating whether there are fire hazards, what the risk of a fire is, and measuring what damages a fire would cause. This evaluation can be done using a hazard analysis.

Continue reading “Fire Protection Engineering Services” »

The Importance of Having the Right Sprinkler System

 Installing a sprinkler system is more than just a required construction cost. Having a sprinkler system that works precisely for your building can save lives and prevent you from spending tens of thousands of dollars on property damage and lost business.

 Architects and building owners across the St. Louis area and the country are recognizing the value of sprinkler systems.

 How Do Sprinkler Systems Work?

Automatic sprinkler systems are heat activated and formed by a network of piping which holds water under pressure. Whenever the temperature rises to the system’s specific heating point, a link will melt or a glass bulb will break. Water is then released to keep the fire from growing.  Typically, only one or two sprinklers are activated. Continue reading “The Importance of Having the Right Sprinkler System” »